prayer

1 In you, O Lord, do I take refuge;
    let me never be put to shame!
In your righteousness deliver me and rescue me;
    incline your ear to me, and save me!
Be to me a rock of refuge,
    to which I may continually come;
you have given the command to save me,
    for you are my rock and my fortress.

Psalm 71:1-3

In the ancient world, villages, peoples, and armies sought protection in a refuge or a fortress. If you’ve read J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, or seen the movies, think Helm’s Deep. The fortress was a place of retreat and defense. It was a shelter.

The psalmist affirms here that the Lord is our refuge, our rock, our fortress.

It is easy for our circumstances and situations in life to overwhelm us. Cancer, covid, catastrophes, raising teenagers, job difficulties, death, disease, interpersonal conflicts, or any number of other events and circumstances can trouble us.

In David’s case, he spent years wandering from rock to cave hiding out from King Saul who wanted to take his life. And David sought the Lord’s protection, and the Lord protected David. Time and again David trusted in the Lord, and the Lord delivered.

Whatever your frustration or concern, your worry or fear, your enemy or your challenge, take refuge in the Lord. But how can we seek refuge in the Lord?

  • Seek refuge in the Lord’s Words. When you make time to read, study, meditate, memorize, and apply God’s Word, you are taking in God’s thoughts. Much of our frustration, worry, and fear derive from a worried mind and burdened thoughts. So dwell on God’s thoughts. Think on his promises. Find refuge in his Words.
  • Seek refuge in the Lord’s presence. Many of us like to solve problems. We like the challenge of navigating a situation, figuring out the next steps, and planning for success. But often we remain stressed and frustrated because we are seeking refuge in our own answers. Pray. Bring your situations to the Lord specifically and intentionally. Seek his presence through prayer.
  • Seek refuge in the the Lord’s people. While our final and ultimate hope cannot be in others and must be in God alone, God did not create us to be alone. God created us for community. He created us to encourage and support one another. Find a friend you trust who is spiritually maturing and share your burden with them. Just someone else aware of your burden and praying for you can aid you in finding refuge in the Lord. Also, intercessory prayer for each other is a heavenly means of experiencing refuge in the Lord.

When we are in need, we need to find refuge in the Lord. Our situations and burdens are not for us alone. God grants them to us or allows us to experience them precisely because he wants us to seek refuge in him. He also wants to use our experience of seeking refuge in the Lord as a means of testimony to others.

Note how the psalmist closes this hymn:

17O God, from my youth you have taught me,
    and I still proclaim your wondrous deeds.
18 So even to old age and gray hairs,
    O God, do not forsake me,
until I proclaim your might to another generation,
    your power to all those to come.

19 Your righteousness, O God,
    reaches the high heavens.
You who have done great things,
    O God, who is like you?
20 You who have made me see many troubles and calamities
    will revive me again;
from the depths of the earth
    you will bring me up again.
21 You will increase my greatness
    and comfort me again.
22 I will also praise you with the harp
    for your faithfulness, O my God;
I will sing praises to you with the lyre,
    O Holy One of Israel.

23 My lips will shout for joy,
    when I sing praises to you;
    my soul also, which you have redeemed.

24 And my tongue will talk of your righteous help all the day long,
for they have been put to shame and disappointed
    who sought to do me hurt.

Psalm 71:17-24 (emphasis mine)

After David sought refuge in the Lord, he promised to testify of the Lord’s goodness to the next generation (v. 18), to praise the Lord’s faithfulness (v. 22), to respond with praise and song (v. 23), and to tell of the Lord’s righteous help “all day long” (v. 24).

When God comes through, we don’t need to remain silent. This is another important reason for God’s people to be apart of our search for refuge. They are witnesses to our situations as well as witnesses to God’s provisions. God’s people are also part of our audience for declaring his praises and his interventions.

So, think back to how God has been your refuge. Share that praise with someone! And by all means, seek the Lord for refuge today.

God astounds me. God is always working, acting, intervening, and saving.

I must admit that often God surprises me. There have been times over the past couple of years where I have been praying diligently for God to save, to heal, or to help in a particular way only to have God save someone I wasn’t expecting or to have God work in a surprising way.

Recently, my devotional reading has brought me back to the book of 1 Samuel. When God called Samuel in chapter 3, God told Samuel about the judgment he was going to bring to Eli and Eli’s family. Think about this for a moment. The first message God gave to young Samuel was not about blessings and glories and miracles, but rather about judgment. Just a few chapters later (but decades later for Samuel), the people of Israel asked for a king. It was a sinful request, and Samuel told them so. Samuel brought the prayer to God. And God told Samuel that he was going to give his people what they asked for even though it was not what they should ask for. Samuel had to receive and deliver this message as well.

Samuel’s experiences are not isolated. Sometimes God answers our prayers as we ask them, and sometimes he doesn’t. Move forward to Acts 12. Herod beheaded James, but God brought about a miracle to release Peter from prison. Why did God rescue Peter but not James? Why does God intervene sometimes and other times it appears that he does not?

As I preached yesterday on the subject of walking wisely in our homes from Proverbs 22:6, I thought of many moms and dads, grandmothers and grandfathers, faithful children and straying children. There are some in my congregation who have prayed diligently for their adult children and grandchildren to come back to the Lord. They’ve prayed, they’ve begged, and they’ve encouraged. Yet it seems like nothing is happening.

Within the last couple of weeks, prayers that I’ve prayed on behalf of others have been answered exactly as I prayed. Other prayers have not. In some cases, God has obviously intervened and healed. In other cases, God has delayed to intervene.

Why? Why is it that sometimes God answers quickly and other times God doesn’t seem to answer at all? Why is it that sometimes God answers in a very different way than we’ve prayed?

I’ve wrestled with these questions as a Christian and as a pastor. And while I don’t have all the answers, I do want to offer a few reminders that might help us through these questions.

  1. Remember: God’s faithfulness is not limited by our experiences. God is faithful no matter what we experience. God has made an absolute promise to us, “I will be with you always” (Jesus in Matthew 28:20). And God’s promise to be with us through the indwelling Holy Spirit is sure and certain. God’s promise to be with us means that sometimes he will be with us through our struggles and difficulties and not always rescue us from our struggles and difficulties. The testimonies from Scripture as well as our own experiences bear this out. Sometimes God intervenes. Sometimes God orchestrates the miraculous. Sometimes God delays. Sometimes God appears to be silent to our burdens. But always God is faithful. That he is with us through our struggles even when we pray that he would rescue us from our struggles is testimony to God’s grace and compassion.
  2. Remember: God’s faithfulness is not limited by our prayers. For Christian growth and maturity, we must pray. And one of the reasons we do pray is because we believe God is able to do more than what we ask (Eph. 3:20). But just because God is able, doesn’t always mean that he will. Prayer for us us is an act of faith. When we pray in the right spirit, we acknowledge our inabilities and God’s sovereignty. And when we pray, we should ask God to intervene, to heal, to rescue, to save, and to restore. We pray to God out of what we know and trust that God knows more and his timing is best.
  3. Remember: God’s faithfulness is not limited by our understanding. We pray to God out of what we know and trust that God knows more and his timing is best. Yes, that’s a repeat sentence. But we need to remember it. Our prayers and our experiences are limited by our understanding. There is so much that we just don’t know. God’s ways are higher than our ways (Isaiah 55:9). God knows everything. He knows how answering our prayers fit into his purposes. It is this recognition that God’s understanding is greater than ours that led Samuel and others throughout the Bible to continue praying even when their circumstances exceeded their understanding.

Where does that leave you and me with our burdens, worries, fears, and prayers? Continue to pray about them. Bring them to the Lord. But remember, you don’t have all the information. You don’t know all. Pray anyway. Pray boldly. Pray big. God can answer any prayer you bring. But even if he doesn’t answer your prayers the way you pray, God is still faithful.

Photo by Emily Morter on Unsplash